Branching Out – A Block A Week

This started with an email, and a rather grainy photo of a few quilt blocks from the 1930s.

The blocks were in a pale blue shade, perhaps aqua, but it was enough to give Susan an idea. And to pull out the fabrics shown for a quilt. Susan? Susan Ashe, acclaimed author and quilter, is going to be known for having a lot of really good ideas on how to have a little fun quilting.

I liked the block because it was a little different from the other tree blocks I’d seen, so I drew it, and started doing the calculations. Then I reviewed Barbara Brackman’s Encyclopedia of Hollow Quilt Patterns, 3rd Edition, and the old block was probably made using an old Chelsea Needlecraft Service pattern from the 1930s – the #854 pine tree quilt.

Our block has two notable differences, the length of the top row of branches is a bit longer, and the construction method is log cabin style. (As in, it’s a little easier to do.)

Fork tomography - digital blocks

Digitally colored options to test the versatility of the block. Midnight Magic 2 Collections – Home Sweet Holidays – Celestial – Newport – Sincerely.

The second part of Susan’s idea was to make a block or two a week, to have a project we could work on when we had little time for sewing. do it! OK.

branch off? the trees. is different. A bit of a different approach. And we both love the name.

block style – Branching instructions

There are two things to mention before creating blocks.

Make a test block. While it’s always a good idea, hands-on with disassembling the stem unit, getting the correct angle on the reversible and stitchable branches, and matching the angle on the first pair of branches, will be time consuming.

block size. There are two block sizes – finished and unfinished sizes are provided.

  • 8″ finished – measures 8½” unfinished
  • 6½” completed – 7″ unfinished actions

Write down the measurement on the smallest block – is Finishes at 6½”, not 6″. (I formulated the mass, knew the measurements, and still forgot about it.)

blocking options. The original block was made using a single fabric for each tree’s branches, and all blocks used the same fabric for the tree trunks. This is one option, and each of the blocks shown above is colored this way.

I usually prefer something more abrasive.

Branching CT - Scrappy Test Block

This is one of my 6″ test blocks. It’s made from woven Jen Kingwell Grainline fabric, and cut from the upcoming Ruby Star Society ship.

session. This block is suitable for diagonal settings, so when you’re thinking about your backing fabrics, remember to include some for the side adjustment triangles and corners.

  • 8″ block completed. Side Adjustment Triangles – Cut 12¾” squares, cutting each square twice on the diagonal to get 4 triangles from each square. Angle Adjusting Triangles – Cut two 6¾” squares, cutting each square once on the diagonal to get two triangles from each square.
  • 6½” finished block. Side Adjust Triangles – Cut 10¾” squares, cut each square twice on the diagonal to get 4 triangles from each square. Angle Adjusting Triangles – Cut two 5¾” squares, cutting each square once on the diagonal to get two triangles from each square.

Branching CT - Planning option 8"

This will be the layout for the prefab blocks 61-8″.

Quilt sizes.

  • 8″ Finishing Block – Make 61 quilt blocks that finish at 67″ x 67″ approximately without borders. The design will consist of six horizontal rows of six blocks each, with split blocks in place of the regular squares. Cut 5 squares for the side adjustment triangles quilt to make 20 triangles. Cut 2 squares for the side adjustment triangles.
  • 6½” finished block – Option 1. Make 85 quilt blocks that finish at 64″ x 64″ approximately without borders. The design will consist of seven horizontal rows of seven blocks each, with split blocks rather than regular squares. Cut 6 squares for the side adjustment triangles to get 24 triangles. Cut 2 squares for the corner setting triangles.
  • 6½” finished block – Option 2. Make 98 quilt blocks that finish at 64″ x 74″ approximately without borders. The design will consist of eight horizontal rows of seven blocks each, with split blocks rather than regular squares. Cut 7 squares for the side adjustment triangles to get 26 triangles. Cut 2 squares for the angle setup triangles.

yardage. How much yardage you’ll need depends on how many blocks you’re making, the size you’re making, whether the branches are sparse, etc.

Background – 8″ finished blocks:

  • A fat quarter will produce enough pieces for 5 blocks and one yard sized piece will produce pieces for 10 blocks.
  • To make 61 blocks with one background – 3¼ yards for blocks. Add 1 yard to set up the triangles.

Background – Finished Blocks 6½″:

  • A fat quarter will produce enough pieces for 7 blocks and a 1-yard block will produce enough pieces for 14 blocks.
  • To make 86 blocks with one back – 3 yards for blocks. Add yards to set up the triangles.
  • To make 98 blocks with one back – 3 yards for blocks. Add 1 yard to set up the triangles.

Fork tomography - bicolor 8" to forbid

Bicolor Trees – This is one of our 8-inch test blocks.

Publications. Advance discounts! This is perfect for Layer Cakes.

  • 8″ block finished. One layer of square cake will produce the cutouts for one whole tree. Just mix and match as desired – twigs in one print, stem in another print. Each LC square will yield 5 slices – 1¾” x 10″.
  • 6½” block finished. One layer of cake box will yield 1½” tree cuts. Mixing and matching will be required for at least some of the blocks. Each LC box will yield 6 strips – 1½” x 10″.

Honey Cakes – Cuts for one tree block require 28 inches, so three strips of honey cake will make four blocks. At least one block must be scattered.

General Assembly. Disassemble the block.

Use a slim” seam all over.

Branching CT Class - Educational College 1

The pictures of the schematic diagram are row 1 – left to right, and row 2 – left to right.

When attaching the triangles to the stem, align the tip of the side triangle with the top of the stem rectangle. The ¼” offset of the seam allowance is not necessary as it will be cut. Press the seams into the stem – or tap them to open.

  • Using a 45-degree line ruler, center the line at the stem. Before cutting, make sure the lines are 3½” on the fabric, so you can trim the square to 3½”.
  • Trim the corner as shown.
  • Flip the unit over and trim the remaining two sides.
  • Turn the cut unit over as shown, and place the ruler across it so that the 1-inch ruler lines pass through the opposing points.

Fork computed tomography - ban tutorial 2

  • Trim the end as shown.
  • Attach the base triangle to the stem and press the triangle welding seam.
  • Trim the unit back to measure 3½” x 3″.
  • there he is. trunk unit.

Fork CT - Blocking Tutorial 3

Branches – records. Use your favorite concept or tool for connector/face and stitching corners. (I love the Cluck Cluck Sew diagonal seam tape.)

Since weaving position and angle are different for the two sets of branches, I recommend trimming branches 1 – 3 – 5 – 7 at the same time. (Shown in the first two pictures above.) Then cut the branches 2 – 4 – 6 – 8. (This is where creating a test template will help.)

  • Place the background rectangle on the print rectangle as shown. Since there is no corner or intersection to keep lining up, marking this point will make these steps a lot easier.
  • Stitch a 45-degree line across the end as shown. Before trimming, double check the angle of the connected cut! Trim the weld line to ¼”.
  • Press the seams to branch – away from the background.
  • Piece the remaining four branches.

Branching of CT Branching - Blocking Tutorial 4

  • Branches 1 and 2. Matching the background edges and the seams on the branches and trunk of the tree, join the first two branches. Press the seams to branch.
    • After sewing, the seams on the branches and the trunk of the tree should coincide exactly – forming an ideal angle of 45 degrees. (If you thought all I had was/perfect…
  • Branches 3 and 4 – these are easy. Align the edges of the background and stitch. Press the seams of the branches.
  • Branches 5 and 6 – continue.
  • Branches 7 and 8 – add branches. Journalism. he did.

I chose to align the background edges of the block first to keep that edge straight, and to help keep the block square.

The stem unit steps are the same for the finished 6½” block, but the measurements are different, so…

CT Branching Blocking Tutorial 5 - 6.5"

  • Using a 45-degree line ruler, center the line at the stem. Before cutting, make sure you have the “three stripes on the fabric, so you can trim the square to 3”.
  • Trim the corner as shown.
  • Flip the unit over and trim the remaining two sides.
  • Turn the cut-out unit over as shown, and place the ruler across it so that the ruler lines pass over the opposite points.

Add the base triangle, and press the triangle’s weld seam. Trim the stem unit to 3″ x 3″.

block style – Branching instructions

So how big is the block you’re making? And do you use one canvas per block, or do you make choppy twigs?

I’ll be back next week with some tips on how to plan/organize this project.

If you join Branching Out, be sure to share your blocks with it # Tranquility. Maybe you can share your test block!

We’ll be sharing the blocks on Moda’s social media, and Susan will be knitting too – @yardgrl60 on Instagram. And I.

I wish you a nice week-end!

To get a PDF of this blog post – Branching – Block Week

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